I don't think I've read a book that has had me in tears like this one. This book is written from two narrative perspectives; De...

Same Kind of Different As Me: Book Review

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I don't think I've read a book that has had me in tears like this one. This book is written from two narrative perspectives; Denver, a modern day ex-slave (if you can even wrap your brain around that) and Ron Hall, the man who became his "friend". 

Let's talk about Denver for a minute. He is a man who grew up in the south, Louisiana to be exact. He was born and raised in what is called "share cropping". Also know as, modern day slavery. How is this you ask? Let me explain. 

"The Man" never got out of holding slaves for generations. He would "allow" people to work on his cotton farm for a percentage of the crop. But by the time the workers/slaves bought commodities on loan, they had nothing to show for it but more debt. The viscous cycle kept the worker always in "The Mans" debt. Thus modern day slavery. 

Denver talks about his life as a slave, his realization that life could be better and his "escape". He draws you into his life making you feel like you are right there with him. He tells about his meeting Mrs. Debbie- Ron Hall's wife. 

The other narrative is written from Ron Hall's perspective as he watches his wife "Mrs. Debbie" proclaim her Christian faith and act upon the Lords calling for her life. I will have to admit, I was at first wondering how he fit into the picture and why it was not written from her perspective, but into the later half of the book I "got it".

The book intertwines both lives, and shows you the depths of despair through viewing real homelessness, grief and fear. But it also expresses great love, trust and hope. 

I laughed out loud, I cried and I changed my view of what homelessness was. I learned something new about myself, I needed to learn to trust more. 

This book will make you learn something new about yourself too!!

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